African TV




Lawyers - Legal Representation






Archives

April 2014
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  

Page added on July 2, 2012

Global News | Comment Feed: RSS 2.0 Printable versionPrint This Post Print This Post

Opinion piece by Judge Sang-Hyun SONG, President of the International Criminal Court

Opinion piece by Judge Sang-Hyun SONG, President of the International Criminal Court thumbnail

International Criminal Court turns tenOn 1 July 2002, the first three staff members of the International Criminal Court (ICC) entered the ICC’s building in The Hague, the Netherlands. On that day, the ICC’s founding treaty, called the Rome Statute, entered into force.  (Photo: Judge Sang-Hyun SONG) 

Ten years after that modest beginning, the ICC has turned into a major international institution, securing justice for victims when it cannot be delivered at the national level. 121 States have ratified the Rome Statute, and another 32 countries have signed it, indicating their intention to join the treaty.  

The ICC is working in seven situation countries, and monitoring developments in seven others on several continents, turning the principles of the Rome Statute into reality. In March this year, the ICC delivered its first judgement in a case concerning the use of child soldiers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Six cases are in the trial stage and nine others in pre-trial phase. These proceedings are testimony that impunity for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity is no longer tolerated by the international community. 

The victims are a vital part of the ICC’s work. Thousands of victims have been given a voice in the arena of international justice, where their rights are upheld and their suffering recognised. The ICC’s proceedings have emphasized, on a global scale, that children cannot be used as soldiers during hostilities, that sexual violence as a weapon of war is an unacceptable international crime, and that those in positions of power must safeguard the fundamental human rights of people caught in conflict. 

Support for international justice is growing around the world every year. Everywhere, people want peace, justice, rule of law and respect for human dignity. The ICC represents the voluntary gathering of nations in a community of values and aspirations for a more secure future for children, women and men around the world. 

However, rather than rejoice over our accomplishments, it is far more important that we recognise the shortcomings and the obstacles that remain, and redouble our commitment to further strengthen the Rome Statute system in order to move closer to our ultimate goals. If we act wisely, pulling our strength together, we can prevent terrible suffering before it takes place.  

The ICC is the centrepiece of the evolving system of international criminal justice, but the most important aspect of the fight against impunity takes place in each country, society and community around the globe. Domestic justice systems must be strong enough to be able to act as the primary deterrent worldwide, while the ICC is a “court of last resort”, a safety net that ensures accountability when the national jurisdictions are unable for whatever reason to carry out this task. In a spirit of solidarity, the States Parties to the Rome Statute have expressed their commitment to work together to ensure that this principle of complementarity is effective. 

Another crucial aspect of the ICC is the cooperation of states and the enforcement of the Court’s orders. The ICC has no police force of its own. The Court relies entirely on states to execute our arrest warrants, to produce evidence, to facilitate the appearance of witnesses and so on. Unfortunately, several suspects subject to ICC arrest warrants have successfully evaded arrest for many years. Political will and international cooperation is crucial in order to bring these persons to justice.  

While we work together to prevent impunity and to ensure accountability, we must remember that international criminal justice is one piece in a bigger framework for protecting human rights, suppressing conflict and working for peace and stabilisation. It is vital that other essential elements of conflict prevention and post-conflict recovery are present where needed, alongside international justice mechanisms. Only when accompanied by education, democracy and development, can justice truly help prevent the crimes of the future. 

Let us cherish our spirit of solidarity as we look forward to the ICC’s next decade, celebrating our achievements and acknowledging the challenges that remain ahead. We must be united in our resolve to defeat impunity and the lawlessness, brutality and disdain for human dignity that it represents. At this crucial juncture, we must continue the fight against impunity with renewed resolve and increased vigour. We cannot rest until every victim has received justice.  

On the 10th anniversary of the International Criminal Court, I call on states, organisations and people everywhere to join this shared mission of humanity. 

Distributed by the African Press Organization on behalf of the International Criminal Court. 

Stay with Sierra Express Media, for your trusted place in news!


© 2012, Sierra Express Media. All rights reserved.

Share


Comments are closed.




RELATED STORIES

Search This Site


BannerFans.com

LATEST NEWS HEADLINES

ALSO IN THE NEWS

Acqua For Life goes continental, providing safe drinking water in Africa, Latin America and Asia thumbnail Acqua For Life goes continental, providing safe drinking water in Africa, Latin America and Asia

GIORGIO ARMANI CONTINUES THE PARTNERSHIP WITH GREEN CROSS TO SUPPORT PROJECTS IN SRI LANKA, IVORY COAST AND SENEGAL FOR FIRST TIME 22 April 2014 | Geneva, Switzerland: Giorgio Armani is expanding its successful Acqua for Life campaign in partnership with Green Cross International for the fourth consecutive year, targeting water-scarce communities in West Africa, Latin America […]

Share

MORE STORIES

US$4million project commissioned at Waterloo 500 youths employed thumbnail US$4million project commissioned at Waterloo 500 youths employed

HAVE YOUR SAY

HAVE YOUR SAY Share you views: What would you like to see more/less of on Sierra Express Media? Send us your ideas and include your name and the area you are writing from.

Our New Website Has a More Efficient Layout

Our New Website Has a More Efficient Layout We invite you to give us your feedback

MORE NEWS HEADLINES